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Inferior vena cava interruption in a liver transplantation deceased donor.

Thu, 12/13/2012 - 12:54

Inferior vena cava interruption in a liver transplantation deceased donor.

Liver Int. 2012 Nov 8;

Authors: Levi Sandri GB, Lai Q, Nudo F, Rossi M

PMID: 23230844 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

Time-dependent study entries and exposures in cohort studies can easily be sources of different and avoidable types of bias.

Thu, 12/13/2012 - 12:54
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Time-dependent study entries and exposures in cohort studies can easily be sources of different and avoidable types of bias.

J Clin Epidemiol. 2012 Nov;65(11):1171-80

Authors: Wolkewitz M, Allignol A, Harbarth S, de Angelis G, Schumacher M, Beyersmann J

Abstract
OBJECTIVES: To display and discuss the reasons and consequences of length and time-dependent bias. They might occur in presence of a time-dependent study entry or a time-dependent exposure which might change from unexposed to exposed.
STUDY DESIGN AND SETTING: Recalling the popular study of Oscar nominees and using a real-data example from hospital epidemiology, we give innovative and easy-to-understand graphical presentations of how these biases corrupt the analyses via distorted time-at-risk. Cumulative hazard plots and Cox proportional hazards models were used. We are building bridges to medical disciplines such as critical care medicine, hepatology, pharmaco-epidemiology, transplantation medicine, neurology, gynecology and cardiology.
RESULTS: In presence of time-dependent bias, the hazard ratio (comparing exposed with unexposed) is artificially underestimated. The length bias leads to an artificial underestimation of the overall hazard. When both biases coexist it can lead to different directions of biased hazard ratios.
CONCLUSION: Since length and time-dependent bias might occur in several medical disciplines, we conclude that understanding and awareness are the best prevention of survival bias.

PMID: 23017635 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

liver transplant; +1300 new citations

Wed, 12/12/2012 - 23:38

1300 new pubmed citations were retrieved for your search. Click on the search hyperlink below to display the complete search results:

liver transplant

These pubmed results were generated on 2012/12/12

PubMed, a service of the National Library of Medicine, includes over 15 million citations for biomedical articles back to the 1950's. These citations are from MEDLINE and additional life science journals. PubMed includes links to many sites providing full text articles and other related resources.

liver transplant; +76 new citations

Wed, 12/12/2012 - 13:23

76 new pubmed citations were retrieved for your search. Click on the search hyperlink below to display the complete search results:

liver transplant

These pubmed results were generated on 2012/12/12

PubMed, a service of the National Library of Medicine, includes over 15 million citations for biomedical articles back to the 1950's. These citations are from MEDLINE and additional life science journals. PubMed includes links to many sites providing full text articles and other related resources.

liver transplant; +77 new citations

Wed, 12/12/2012 - 01:01

77 new pubmed citations were retrieved for your search. Click on the search hyperlink below to display the complete search results:

liver transplant

These pubmed results were generated on 2012/12/11

PubMed, a service of the National Library of Medicine, includes over 15 million citations for biomedical articles back to the 1950's. These citations are from MEDLINE and additional life science journals. PubMed includes links to many sites providing full text articles and other related resources.

Periodontal status in post-liver transplantation patients: 10 years of follow-up.

Fri, 11/02/2012 - 19:09
Related Articles

Periodontal status in post-liver transplantation patients: 10 years of follow-up.

Quintessence Int. 2012 Nov;43(10):879-85

Authors: Machtei EE, Falah M, Oettinger-Barak O, Baruch Y, Horwitz J

Abstract
Objective: To compare the current (t1) periodontal status of post-liver transplantation patients to their status 10 years earlier (t0). Method and Materials: Seventeen patients 45 to 71 years of age who were evaluated approximately 10 years previously were enrolled in the study. All subjects had undergone a liver transplantation 1 to 10 years prior to the initial examination (t0). Clinical and radiographic parameters were recorded for the Ramfjord Index teeth and compared between t0 and t1, including Plaque Index (PI), Gingival Index (GI), probing depth (PD), clinical attachment level (CAL), and gingival overgrowth (GO). Bone loss was measured on digitized images of panoramic radiographs. Results: Mean PI, GI, CAL, and GO were slightly lower at t1 than at t0; however, these differences were not statistically significant (P > .05, Student t test for paired observations). The mean PD was reduced at t1 (2.43 ± 0.18 mm) compared with t0 (3.35 ± 0.22 mm), which was statistically significant (P = .001, Student t test for paired observations). To the contrary, the mean radiographic bone loss at t1 was higher than at t0 (5.61 vs 4.48 mm, respectively), which was also statistically significant (P = .017). Tooth loss was observed in some of these patients, ranging from 0 to 4 during the 10 years of follow-up, which amounted to an annual rate of 0.24 teeth per patient. Conclusion: Post-liver transplantation patients maintained stable clinical periodontal parameters during a 10-year period; however, some radiographic bone loss occurred during this time.

PMID: 23115767 [PubMed - in process]

Severe Acute Hyperkalemia during Pre-Anhepatic Stage in Cadaveric Orthotopic Liver Transplantation.

Fri, 11/02/2012 - 19:09
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Severe Acute Hyperkalemia during Pre-Anhepatic Stage in Cadaveric Orthotopic Liver Transplantation.

Iran J Med Sci. 2012 Sep;37(3):208-10

Authors: Sahmeddini MA, Khosravi MB

Abstract
A serious hazard to patients during orthotopic liver transplantation is hyperkalemia. Although the most frequent and hazardous hyperkalemia occurs immediately after reperfusion of the newly transplanted liver, morbid hyperkalemia could happen in the other phases during orthotopic liver transplantation. However, pre-anhepatic hyperkalemia during orthotopic liver transplantation is rare. This report describes one such patient, who without transfusion, developed severe hyperkalemia during pre-anhepatic phase. The variations in serum potassium concentration of the present case indicate that it is necessary to take care of the changes of serum potassium concentration not only during reperfusion but also during the other phases of the liver transplantation.

PMID: 23115456 [PubMed - in process]

Intravital microscopy through an abdominal imaging window reveals a pre-micrometastasis stage during liver metastasis.

Fri, 11/02/2012 - 19:09
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Intravital microscopy through an abdominal imaging window reveals a pre-micrometastasis stage during liver metastasis.

Sci Transl Med. 2012 Oct 31;4(158):158ra145

Authors: Ritsma L, Steller EJ, Beerling E, Loomans CJ, Zomer A, Gerlach C, Vrisekoop N, Seinstra D, van Gurp L, Schäfer R, Raats DA, de Graaff A, Schumacher TN, de Koning EJ, Rinkes IH, Kranenburg O, Rheenen Jv

Abstract
Cell dynamics in subcutaneous and breast tumors can be studied through conventional imaging windows with intravital microscopy. By contrast, visualization of the formation of metastasis has been hampered by the lack of long-term imaging windows for metastasis-prone organs, such as the liver. We developed an abdominal imaging window (AIW) to visualize distinct biological processes in the spleen, kidney, small intestine, pancreas, and liver. The AIW can be used to visualize processes for up to 1 month, as we demonstrate with islet cell transplantation. Furthermore, we have used the AIW to image the single steps of metastasis formation in the liver over the course of 14 days. We observed that single extravasated tumor cells proliferated to form "pre-micrometastases," in which cells lacked contact with neighboring tumor cells and were active and motile within the confined region of the growing clone. The clones then condensed into micrometastases where cell migration was strongly diminished but proliferation continued. Moreover, the metastatic load was reduced by suppressing tumor cell migration in the pre-micrometastases. We suggest that tumor cell migration within pre-micrometastases is a contributing step that can be targeted therapeutically during liver metastasis formation.

PMID: 23115354 [PubMed - in process]

HCC Is promoted by bacterial translocation and TLR-4 signaling: A new paradigm for chemoprevention and management.

Fri, 11/02/2012 - 19:09
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HCC Is promoted by bacterial translocation and TLR-4 signaling: A new paradigm for chemoprevention and management.

Hepatology. 2012 Nov;56(5):1998-2000

Authors: Toffanin S, Cornella H, Harrington A, Llovet JM

PMID: 23115011 [PubMed - in process]

Blood group A(int) causing uncertainty during organ donor work-up for incompatible (A(2)-O) liver transplantation.

Fri, 11/02/2012 - 19:09
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Blood group A(int) causing uncertainty during organ donor work-up for incompatible (A(2)-O) liver transplantation.

Blood Transfus. 2012 Oct 11;:1-2

Authors: Sachan D

PMID: 23114528 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

Abdominopelvic actinomycosis associated with an intrauterine device and presenting with a rectal mass and hydronephrosis: a troublesome condition for the clinician.

Fri, 11/02/2012 - 19:09
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Abdominopelvic actinomycosis associated with an intrauterine device and presenting with a rectal mass and hydronephrosis: a troublesome condition for the clinician.

Int Surg. 2012 Jul;97(3):254-9

Authors: Yilmaz M, Akbulut S, Samdanci ET, Yilmaz S

Abstract
Abstract Actinomycosis is an uncommon, chronic, granulomatous disease that can be mistaken for a malignant tumor. Abdominopelvic actinomycosis constitutes about 20% of all actinomycosis cases and may mimic malignancy, tuberculosis, or other abdominopelvic inflammatory diseases. This condition is more prevalent in women who use an intrauterine device. We treated a 44-year-old woman who presented with vaginal discharge, right flank pain, dysuria, and difficulty with defecation. She had anorexia and weight loss (8 kg) during the previous 2 months and had a history of intrauterine device use for 12 years. Clinical, radiologic, and endoscopic examinations revealed a rectal mass and right hydronephrosis. Rectal biopsy showed nonspecific colitis. Laparotomy showed a mass that was invading and obstructing the pelvic orifice. Surgery included total abdominal hysterectomy, bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy, appendectomy, low anterior resection, and Hartmann colostomy. Histopathologic evaluation of surgical specimens showed actinomycosis originating from the tubo-ovarian structures and invading the rectal wall. The patient was placed on penicillin for 6 months, and then had closure of the colostomy with no complication.

PMID: 23113856 [PubMed - in process]

Liver hydatid cyst rupture into the peritoneal cavity after abdominal trauma: case report and literature review.

Fri, 11/02/2012 - 19:09
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Liver hydatid cyst rupture into the peritoneal cavity after abdominal trauma: case report and literature review.

Int Surg. 2012 Jul;97(3):239-44

Authors: Yilmaz M, Akbulut S, Kahraman A, Yilmaz S

Abstract
Abstract The aim of this study was to review the literature regarding the rupture of hydatid cysts into the abdominal cavity after trauma. We present both a new case of hydatid cyst rupture that occurred after blunt abdominal trauma and a literature review of studies published in the English language about hydatid cyst rupture after trauma; studies were accessed from PubMed, Google Scholar, EBSCO, EMBASE, and MEDLINE databases. We identified 22 articles published between 2000 and 2011 about hydatid cyst rupture after trauma. Of these, 5 articles were excluded because of insufficient data, duplication, or absence of intra-abdominal dissemination. The other 17 studies included 68 patients (38 males and 30 females) aged 8 to 76 years who had a ruptured hydatid cyst detected after trauma. The most common trauma included traffic accidents and falls. Despite optimal surgical and antihelmintic therapy, 7 patients developed recurrence. Complications included biliary fistula in 5 patients, incisional hernia in 2 patients, and gastrocutaneous fistula in 1 patient. Death occurred from intraoperative anaphylactic shock in 1 patient and gastrointestinal bleeding and pulmonary failure in 1 patient. Rupture of a hydatid cyst into the peritoneal cavity is rare and challenging for the surgeon. This condition is included in the differential diagnosis of the acute abdomen in endemic areas, especially in young patients.

PMID: 23113853 [PubMed - in process]

Donor-derived Coccidioides immitis fungemia in solid organ transplant recipients.

Fri, 11/02/2012 - 19:09
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Donor-derived Coccidioides immitis fungemia in solid organ transplant recipients.

Transpl Infect Dis. 2012 Jun;14(3):305-10

Authors: Blodget E, Geiseler PJ, Larsen RA, Stapfer M, Qazi Y, Petrovic LM

Abstract
We report disseminated coccidioidomycosis in 3 transplant recipients from a donor in an endemic area found to have unrecognized meningeal coccidioidomycosis. All 3 transplant recipients presented within 3 weeks of receipt of their organ. Only 1 organ recipient survived the acute presentation of coccidioidomycosis. Serologic testing for Coccidioides immitis infection should be considered for organ donors residing in endemic areas.

PMID: 22176511 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

5-Fluorouracil Nanoparticles Inhibit Hepatocellular Carcinoma via Activation of the p53 Pathway in the Orthotopic Transplant Mouse Model.

Fri, 10/19/2012 - 11:58

5-Fluorouracil Nanoparticles Inhibit Hepatocellular Carcinoma via Activation of the p53 Pathway in the Orthotopic Transplant Mouse Model.

PLoS One. 2012;7(10):e47115

Authors: Cheng M, He B, Wan T, Zhu W, Han J, Zha B, Chen H, Yang F, Li Q, Wang W, Xu H, Ye T

Abstract
Biodegradable polymer nanoparticle drug delivery systems provide targeted drug delivery, improved pharmacokinetic and biodistribution, enhanced drug stability and fewer side effects. These drug delivery systems are widely used for delivering cytotoxic agents. In the present study, we synthesized GC/5-FU nanoparticles by combining galactosylated chitosan (GC) material with 5-FU, and tested its effect on liver cancer in vitro and in vivo. The in vitro anti-cancer effects of this sustained release system were both dose- and time-dependent, and demonstrated higher cytotoxicity against hepatic cancer cells than against other cell types. The distribution of GC/5-FU in vivo revealed the greatest accumulation in hepatic cancer tissues. GC/5-FU significantly inhibited tumor growth in an orthotropic liver cancer mouse model, resulting in a significant reduction in tumor weight and increased survival time in comparison to 5-FU alone. Flow cytometry and TUNEL assays in hepatic cancer cells showed that GC/5-FU was associated with higher rates of G0-G1 arrest and apoptosis than 5-FU. Analysis of apoptosis pathways indicated that GC/5-FU upregulates p53 expression at both protein and mRNA levels. This in turn lowers Bcl-2/Bax expression resulting in mitochondrial release of cytochrome C into the cytosol with subsequent caspase-3 activation. Upregulation of caspase-3 expression decreased poly ADP-ribose polymerase 1 (PARP-1) at mRNA and protein levels, further promoting apoptosis. These findings indicate that sustained release of GC/5-FU nanoparticles are more effective at targeting hepatic cancer cells than 5-FU monotherapy in the mouse orthotropic liver cancer mouse model.

PMID: 23077553 [PubMed - in process]

Caveat oncologist: clinical findings and consequences of distributing counterfeit erythropoietin in the United States.

Fri, 10/19/2012 - 11:58

Caveat oncologist: clinical findings and consequences of distributing counterfeit erythropoietin in the United States.

J Oncol Pract. 2012 Mar;8(2):84-90

Authors: Qureshi ZP, Norris L, Sartor O, McKoy JM, Armstrong J, Raisch DW, Garg V, Stafkey-Mailey D, Bennett CL

Abstract
PURPOSE: Counterfeit pharmaceuticals pose risks domestically. Because of their cost, cancer pharmaceuticals are vulnerable. We review findings from a domestic counterfeiting episode involving erythropoietin and outline anticounterfeiting recommendations for policy makers, patients, and health care professionals.
MATERIALS AND METHODS: Information was obtained on patients who received counterfeit erythropoietin, its distribution, and criminal investigations into counterfeiting networks. Interview sources included a physician, an attorney, employees of the Florida Department of Health and Human Services and the US Food and Drug Administration's (FDA) Office of Criminal Investigation, manufacturers, and wholesalers. Other sources included the book "Dangerous Doses," LexisNexis (search terms "counterfeit" and "erythropoietin") and the FDA database.
RESULTS: Counterfeit product consisted of 2,000 U vials with counterfeit labels denoting 40,000 U. The counterfeiters, in collaboration with a Miami pharmacy, purchased 110,000 erythropoietin 2,000 U vials and affixed counterfeit labels to each vial. Products were then sold via the pharmaceutical "gray market" to wholesalers, then pharmacy chains. Investigations by Florida government officials implicated 17 persons, all of whom were found guilty of trafficking in counterfeit pharmaceuticals. Despite the large size of the operation, the FDA received reports of only 12 patients who had received counterfeit erythropoietin and detailed information for only two individuals. A 17-year-old liver transplant recipient and a 61-year-old patient with breast cancer experienced loss of efficacy after receiving counterfeit erythropoietin.
CONCLUSION: Wider use of FDA anticounterfeit initiatives, limiting pharmaceutical suppliers to reputable distributors, and educating providers and patients about signs of counterfeit drugs can improve the safety of cancer pharmaceuticals.

PMID: 23077434 [PubMed - in process]

Endovascular caudal retraction of the cranial end of a misplaced Viatorr TIPS prior to liver transplantation.

Fri, 10/19/2012 - 11:58

Endovascular caudal retraction of the cranial end of a misplaced Viatorr TIPS prior to liver transplantation.

Proc (Bayl Univ Med Cent). 2012 Oct;25(4):341-3

Authors: Ray MJ, Savage C, Klintmalm GB, Rees CR

Abstract
Transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) extension far into the inferior vena cava (IVC) or the right atrium may complicate or preclude orthotopic liver transplantation depending on the space available for placement of a hemostatic clamp in the suprahepatic IVC. Until 2004, most TIPS were performed with bare metal stents, which integrate into the vessel wall, making percutaneous or intraoperative repositioning uncertain. Most TIPS are currently created with stent grafts that have an outer fabric to increase shunt patency and prevent endothelial ingrowth. We describe the first known manipulation of a covered stent graft prior to transplantation. The stent graft, which extended well into the IVC, was snared from a femoral approach and deflected caudally in order to document feasibility and nonadherence to the vein wall prior to definitive surgical planning of liver transplantation. Provisions were made for endovascular retraction during actual transplant surgery 9 weeks later, but this became unnecessary when manual retraction of the exposed liver enabled suprahepatic IVC clamping. Due to the nonadherent nature of the outer graft material, compared with a bare metal stent, extension of a stent graft into the IVC or right atrium may not preclude transplantation, and intraoperative endovascular retraction may be considered.

PMID: 23077382 [PubMed - in process]

Ursodeoxycholic acid for cystic fibrosis-related liver disease.

Fri, 10/19/2012 - 11:58

Ursodeoxycholic acid for cystic fibrosis-related liver disease.

Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2012;10:CD000222

Authors: Cheng K, Ashby D, Smyth RL

Abstract
BACKGROUND: Cystic fibrosis-related liver disease peaks in adolescence with up to 20% of people with cystic fibrosis developing chronic liver disease. Early changes in the liver may ultimately result in end-stage liver disease with people needing transplantation. One therapeutic option currently used is ursodeoxycholic acid.
OBJECTIVES: To analyse evidence that ursodeoxycholic acid improves indices of liver function, reduces the risk of developing chronic liver disease and improves outcomes in general in cystic fibrosis.
SEARCH METHODS: We searched the Cochrane CF and Genetic Disorders Group Trials Register comprising references identified from comprehensive electronic database searches, handsearches of relevant journals and abstract books of conference proceedings. We also contacted drug companies.Date of the most recent search of the Group's trials register: 10 July 2012.
SELECTION CRITERIA: Randomised controlled trials of the use of ursodeoxycholic acid for at least three months compared with placebo or no additional treatment in people with cystic fibrosis.
DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: Two authors independently assessed trial eligibility and quality.
MAIN RESULTS: Ten trials have been identified, of which three trials involving 118 participants were included. The complex design used in two trials meant that data could only be analysed for subsets of participants. There was no significant difference in weight change, mean difference -0.90 kg (95% confidence interval -1.94 to 0.14) based on 30 participants from two trials. Improvement in biliary excretion was reported in only one trial and no significant change after treatment was shown. Long-term outcomes such as death or need for liver transplantation were not reported.
AUTHORS' CONCLUSIONS: There are few trials assessing the effectiveness of ursodeoxycholic acid. There is insufficient evidence to justify its routine use in cystic fibrosis.

PMID: 23076885 [PubMed - in process]

[Current aspects of diagnostics of hepatic dysfunction in critically ill].

Fri, 10/19/2012 - 11:58

[Current aspects of diagnostics of hepatic dysfunction in critically ill].

Dtsch Med Wochenschr. 2012 Oct;137(43):2212-6

Authors: Gonnert F, Bauer M, Kortgen A

Abstract
Hepatic dysfunction may develop in critically ill patients in the course of extrahepatic diseases such as sepsis and is frequently limiting prognosis.Conventional "static" laboratory parameters assess hepatocellular damage, synthetic function or cholestasis, providing informations about (differential) diagnostic aspects, while their significance to assess rapid changes in flow and function in the critical care setting is limited.In contrast, quantitative (or "dynamic") liver function tests, such as measurement of plasma disappearance rate of indocyanine green (PDRICG) or 13C-methacetin metabolism, assess specific metabolic and/or excretory function of the liver together with sinusoidal perfusion at the time of measurement and can detect liver dysfunction early in the course of critical illness. In addition, PDRICG demonstrated prognostic significance, albeit, severity of canalicular excretory dysfunction might be underestimated.For chronic liver disease, scoring systems, such as the Child-Turcotte-Pugh-score or the MELD, were developed to assess severity of disease and probability of survival. Scoring systems are also used for graft allocation. Combining scoring systems with dynamic tests holds the potential to improve predictive value, e. g. in the transplant setting.

PMID: 23076668 [PubMed - in process]

OCT4 regulates epithelial-mesenchymal transition and its knockdown inhibits colorectal cancer cell migration and invasion.

Fri, 10/19/2012 - 11:58

OCT4 regulates epithelial-mesenchymal transition and its knockdown inhibits colorectal cancer cell migration and invasion.

Oncol Rep. 2012 Oct 17;

Authors: Dai X, Ge J, Wang X, Qian X, Zhang C, Li X

Abstract
Octamer-binding transcription factor 4 (OCT4) has been implicated in cancer metastasis. In this study, we investigated whether OCT4 promotes colorectal cancer (CRC) metastasis through the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) process. We designed our experiment as a loss-of-function study. Western blot analysis was used to measure the extent and stability of OCT4 knockdown. We evaluated the metastatic phenotype of OCT4-silenced SW620 cells using standard migration and invasion assays in vitro and the commonly used mouse model for experimental metastases in vivo. We found that OCT4 knockdown inhibited colorectal cancer cell motility and invasion (in vitro) and decreased hepatic colonization (in vivo). It also induced changes in EMT characteristic cell morphology and marker gene expression. In addition, its knockdown decreased WNT pathway activity. Finally, in human primary colorectal cancers, the frequency of upregulated OCT4 expression in cases with liver metastasis was statistically higher than that in cases without liver metastasis. These results indicate that OCT4 may contribute to CRC cell metastasis through EMT and serves as a promising biomarker for identifying CRC patients at high risk for liver metastases.

PMID: 23076549 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

Selection of Hepatocyte-Like Cells from Mouse Differentiated Embryonic Stem Cells and Application in Therapeutic Liver Repopulation.

Fri, 10/19/2012 - 11:58

Selection of Hepatocyte-Like Cells from Mouse Differentiated Embryonic Stem Cells and Application in Therapeutic Liver Repopulation.

Cell Physiol Biochem. 2012 Oct 19;30(5):1271-1286

Authors: Deng XG, Qiu RL, Li ZX, Zhang J, Zhou JJ, Wu YH, Zeng LX, Tang J

Abstract
Backgroud/Aim: Because of the oncogenic risk, it is important to gain the homogeneous and purified cells from differentiated ESCs before transplantation. Here, we aim to select hepatocyte-like cells from differentiated ESCs, and investigate their growth, differentiation and neoplastic formation after intrahepatic transplantation. Methods: Mouse ESCs were primarily induced by Dexamethesone, FGF-4 and HGF sequentially, then placed to a conditioning selection media consisting of 5% cholestatic sera and cultivated for 2 wks. After labeled by CFDA-SE, the selected cells were transplanted into mouse liver in therapeutic liver repopulation models. Results: In the early stage of screening cultivation, most cells were suffered from apoptosis or even death. 1w later, some hepatocyte-like colony-forming units were observed, then the selected cells could grow and tend to be more mature, as assessed by morphological and functional tests. After intrahepatic transplantation, the labeled cells could proliferate and expressed albumin. Moreover, teratoma didn't form over 3 months. Conclusion: Our conditioning selection media could not only effectively select hepatocyte-like cells from differentiated ESCs, but further promote their growth and differentiation as well. After intrahepatic transplantation in therapeutic liver repopulation models, the selected cells could grow, differentiate and keep partial hepatic function. In particular, the transplantation was safe.

PMID: 23075756 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

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